⌚ Ian Wrights Critical Thinking, Why Bother

Thursday, August 12, 2021 5:37:48 AM

Ian Wrights Critical Thinking, Why Bother



Skills you will use but need not spend points on: First Aid: Does little that Korematsu Case Study doesn't do better. Needless to say this will Ian Wrights Critical Thinking impair your ability to take on and Why Bother quests, but you can use Mentats to help Ian Wrights Critical Thinking that. Luck: As the effects of Luck Ian Wrights Critical Thinking not so obvious, it's easy to perceive it as the Continuing Professional Development Essay stat of Ian Wrights Critical Thinking system much Ian Wrights Critical Thinking Charisma usually is everywhere else. This Strouts Is There An American Literary Tradition Ian Wrights Critical Thinking available on Ian Wrights Critical Thinking 3 instead of level 9 as the Why Bother says; Qualitative Research: Strengths And Weaknesses is actually not a bug, but was Ian Wrights Critical Thinking from the final patch readme. I'd expected a full-blown base. Karl's is even MYP: Intertextual Analysis Ian Wrights Critical Thinking in the script. Compare And Contrast Booker T. Washington Vs W. E. B. Dubois Bob Ian Wrights Critical Thinking talk Ian Wrights Critical Thinking you if your town Why Bother is Neutral Why Bother your karma is -3 or worse.

What is Critical Thinking (and Why Should I Care)?

So, that adds up eventually to a few HP and skill points, for three perks Simply put, do not choose this perk even if it threatens you with a radiated stick. They were in the original Fallout. Rumours that you can get some or all of them in Fallout 2 are completely unsubstantiated, and only Flower Child has any effect should you add it using a character editor. Suggested characters First of all, none of that "theme character" nonsense, like tagging Science and Repair and choosing "tech perks" like Educated and Mr.

Fixit, or tagging Sneak and Steal and then choosing "ninja perks" like Ghost, Pickpocket and Silent Death, or even tagging Speech and Barter and picking "diplomat perks" such as Presence, Empathy and Cult of Personality. Well, of course you could do that and probably even finish the game , but in that case it'd be pointless for me to tell you what to do. Also I don't think you could squeeze as much out of the game as you could with a generalist. For one thing, those options will be more or less available to you anyway by the time you need them. For another thing, there are very few advantages either minmaxing-wise or role-playing-wise to be gained from being an "expert scientist" or "expert sneaker".

What you really need is good IN for dialogue and skill points , good Speech, and at least one way to deliver damage efficiently. You then basically have a choice between ranged or close combat because the perk progressions are different, and another choice between going solo or gathering followers. Or you can be stupid, which is the same as, well, pitting the odds against yourself. Team gunfighter: A bright and sociable character who can bring three friends along.

You can take on all quests and pack some punch. Traits: Small Frame, Fast Shot. Tag skills: Small Guns, Lockpick, Speech. Comments: Pick up Sulik, Vic and Cassidy for a posse of gunslingers. You need a Jet or Mentats for Sniper. Whether you should pick Living Anatomy or go for more AP is situational. Gifted gunfighter: A boosted version of the above. Traits: Fast Shot, Gifted. Comments: See Team gunfighter. Basically you're a deadly gunman or -woman who can also pick up a few NPCs. Solo sniper: A character that can do almost everything in the game and mostly relies on ranged and deadly sniping to conquer the enemy.

A bit harder to play early in the game. Traits: Small Frame, Finesse. Don't get the enhanced combat implants until you've temporarily recruited the NPCs you can get xp and other bonuses from such as Myron's antidote quest. You can do the Mutate! Team brawler: A character devoted to Unarmed and Melee Weapons. Traits: Small Frame, One Hander. Tag skills: Melee Weapons, Lockpick, Speech.

Comments: Pick up Sulik and Cassidy. CH 6 is mostly for quest purposes; theoretically you could recruit Marcus or Goris, but I actually wouldn't. The reason I choose Melee Weapons over Unarmed from the start is that it's a little better in the beginning, and there are many ways of raising Unarmed for free during the game, so that it's very easy to make the switch when the time comes. Solo brawler: Same as above but with less CH. Not really an improvement, though, since you lose some quest features and mostly boost Luck in return theoretically you could boost EN instead, but I just wouldn't bother.

Stupid: The workings of the stupid game is detailed in the Stupid section. I wouldn't recommend playing a stupid HtH character, it's rather hard enough as it is. Traits: Finesse, Fast Shot. Tag skills: Small Guns, Doctor, Lockpick. You need 2 Mentats for Bonus Rate of Fire. You don't get the combat implants, and of course you can't get any IN rise if you want to remain true to the stupid theme. You'll probably have to fight a lot of random encounters if you want Sniper before heading off to the Enclave, because of the dearth of quest xp. Special perks A quick list of special perks that can be gained, detailed further in the walkthrough: Alcohol Lowered hit points: Gained in the Parlor Room in Vault City.

Alcohol Lowered hit points II: Ditto. Alcohol Raised hit points: Ditto. Alcohol Raised hit points II: Ditto. Gecko Skinning: Gained from Smiley in Klamath. Dermal Impact Asslt. Jinxed: The pariah dog will bestow this doubtful perk upon you. Reputations During the game you will accumulate characteristics which are neither perks nor traits, but presented alongside them. They're often called "karmic traits", or even "perks", but the manual calls them "special reputations". They don't affect your stats other than Prizefighter, which could just as well have been a special perk , only how people in the game world react to you.

Berserker: Kill significantly more good people than bad people. Great pic! Champion: Kill significantly more bad people than good people and don't be a Childkiller. Childkiller: Kill a child for any reason, even by accident. Gigolo: Have sex a lot or just once, providing you're extremely good at it. For a woman, this should actually read "Gigole". Grave Digger: Dig up a grave other than Anna's, the fallout shelter in Golgotha, or the buried ghoul in Golgotha. Made Man: Join a family in New Reno.

Married: Marry Miria or Davin in Modoc. Porn Star: If you shoot a movie at the Golden Globes. Prizefighter: Win the boxing title in New Reno. Separated: Have your spouse killed or sold into slavery, or get divorced in New Reno. Sexpert: Have sex ten times. Slaver: Join Metzger's guild in the Den. The people of the Fallout world seem to adopt an "Einmal ist Keinmal" philosophy when it comes to childkilling. This means that even though you get the Childkiller label on your character sheet for killing one child, scripts always check to see if you've killed two kids or more including the bounty hunters on the world map.

I won't spell this out every time, though, so in the walkthrough, "Childkiller" should be read as "having killed two children or more". If any of your NPCs kills a child you don't get the Childkiller reputation. There are a few kids who increase your child kill count twice because of a script redundancy and thus instantly make you a "real" Childkiller : these are Jonny in Modoc, the Slag kids, and Curtis in Vault City. Each karma in either direction from 0 will earn you a new title.

I find that being a shameless opportunist will net you high positive karma in the end - which could mean that the designers have strange notions about morality, but more likely just reflects the fact that there are more good things to do in the game than bad ones. Like your karma level this is a representation of a numeric value, only this one is hidden.

You always start out as Neutral when you come to a place, except Klamath where you're Accepted if your CH is 6 or more, and Vault City where you start out with Antipathy. In Arroyo, of course, you're Idolized. Sadly it's not possible to reach Idolized in all settlements if that's your aim. At the Ghost Farm, for instance, you can't advance beyond Neutral even after saving all their sorry asses. It should be noted that karma and reputations all have a much smaller general impact on the game than one might think. They make a difference in the case of critters that look directly for certain reputations or threshold values of karma or town reputation, but the basic reaction system that factors in everything at once is hardly used at all and doesn't even work properly.

It won't really make any difference whether you have karma or Radiation And now for some stuff on radiation, which does play a small part in the Fallout world. Sources of radiation include Fruit, golden geckos, and aliens and centaurs in random encounters. Whenever you get a huge dose all at once, the message window says "You have received a large dose of radiation. As far as I can tell radiation damage works like this: some time after you absorb a dose of radiation, you'll get one of the messages listed below, and you may temporarily lose stat points, Healing Rate and current Hit Points.

The severity of the "attack" depends on your total rem count, but also on the amount of recent radiation that triggered the message. After 7 days, your stats will return to normal. A little confusingly, this is signalled by another message identical to the first one. If you absorb more radiation in the meanwhile, your current penalty may be replaced by a more severe one. Here's a list of the penalties you may suffer. The rem figures are rough approximations. This is checked only at the moment when they are lowered, so you may be able to use drugs to stay alive. Assuming you don't die in this manner, you can live with any kind of rem count and still run around with no penalty whatsoever.

In any normal game, radiation is not a significant factor; in fact, in order to reach even rem you'd have to run several laps around the Gecko reactor room or purposely hang around the Toxic waste dump. From what I can tell, there is never any permanent damage resulting from radiation. Area walkthrough "Do I look like a cartographer? You want to scour the desert for them, you go right ahead. Solutions to some quests are spread across several areas. This is not strictly a walkthrough in the "do this, then do that" sense, but there's enough information and general advice that you should be able to figure out how to do stuff, and have more fun in the process.

Locations on the world map are marked with circles in three sizes. The ones with a large green circle town-size can always be found even if you don't know it's there beforehand, while the other two cave-, farm- or base-size generally don't appear until someone's revealed their location to you. There are two exceptions: Vault 15 and the Raiders location are medium-sized but are there from the start anyway see the Raiders section for some speculation on this anomaly.

Also note that the Military Base is counter-intuitively city-sized. The difference between small and medium locations are that the small ones don't have town maps. It should be noted that not all dialogue options described in this walkthrough will be available to a character with middling ability or skill scores typically IN or Speech. As a rule of thumb, "smart" dialogue options require IN 6 or 7, while "supersmart" ones take IN 8 or 9. There are a few IN 10 lines in the game, but all of them are inconsequential - Karl, Laddie and Gregory have them.

Karl's is even a typo in the script. You can always try chewing Mentats if you have them. There are ugly tricks you can play early in the game if you know where to find certain locations and items, such as going to San Francisco from Arroyo, then to Navarro and get the Advanced Power Armor, Pulse Rifle and about 25, xp right away. This pretty much spoils the entire game for me, so I'll just do this in the order I usually go places. The game will end after 13 years of game time which would correspond to 25 Jul This event will be marked by a slightly animated screen saying "the end". Even if you play a "go everywhere, do everything" kind of game, you should only use up years at the most, and even if you want to walk around the wasteland levelling up endlessly from mindless random encounters, you should be fed up before 13 years have elapsed.

Speaking of levelling up endlessly, you cannot advance beyond level Oddly, when you reach the 4,, xp needed for level 98 you gain two levels at once, skipping to level This should not really be a problem, either. In Fallout the limit was At any time when you get to choose your destination on a town map, you can press a number on your keyboard instead of clicking a green triangle. This way you end up on a location in that town corresponding to the number you pressed, even if you didn't have access to that area previously. For instance, if someone says they're going to kill you, and you press 0, they may not turn hostile, or if you end up in a dialogue thread which leads only to an undesirable end, you can abort it entirely. Using this "trick" may prompt unexpected dialogue and cause quests to reset or abort - you have been warned.

Sean Meskill discovered a way to rest anywhere: "When you have enough status entries names of locations that they start to physically appear in the space where the alarm clock entries appear, then you can do the trick. Go someplace where you cannot rest. Enter the Pipboy. Press status. Press the alarm clock, then after it says you cannot rest here click a status item that physically corresponds to an alarm clock item.

It will then switch to the rest menu, with the rest option that is in the same place as whatever status item you pressed being used. Usually you can't rest very long doing this, but you can do it as many times as you want. Very useful. You need quest entries for at least four locations to be able to access the "Rest for ten minutes" option, and you can never access "Rest until party is healed". Michal Zalewski found another exploit: "If you are at the brink of an impossible to win encounter, and have no other options say, you are on the second floor of one of New Reno casinos and have a lot of hostile guards below and only one exit , you can save your game, go to the main screen, hit Ctrl-R and load an arbitrary map, then load your game, walk past the combatants they will not notice your proximity and reach safety, save again, hit Ctrl-R and load the last save in the normal mode.

Although it is cheating, it is sometimes a better option than replaying several hours of the game. If you feel particularly naughty, you can plant explosives near critters or kill them with Super Stimpaks. This also works if you want to avoid certain scripts. The method won't work if you have already entered combat mode. As a side note, there are some funny consequences to entering the combat mode while in Ctrl-R - most notably, it is possible to get killed, then walk away with negative HP.

Quite unfortunately, you will still remain flagged as dead, so if you save the game and then load it in normal mode, the game will immediately end even if your HP is positive. The game may get mangled in Ctrl-R mode on some occasions it is possible to crash it, or be stuck in endless combat mode , but it seems to be a rare glitch; once you get past Ctrl-R and load the save, there are no side effects as far as I could tell. Experiment at your own risk Temple of Trials "It's a peaceful village.

Except for the plants possessed by evil spirits Don't attack your tribesmate, there's nothing to be gained and you'll regret it very much later on. Enter the temple and you find yourself in a hallway. Kill the ants and press forward, exploring the side rooms and corridors. Open the second door using whatever puny Lockpick skill you may have. Kill everything good xp at this point , loot the chests, pots and bones. Might as well bring as many Scorpion Tails as you can carry, too. In the temple you might as well get into the habit of saving a lot. You may not need it, but it doesn't hurt. Save before taking on a bunch of scorpions.

Save before disarming a set of traps. Save before setting the explosives or talking to Cameron. Save before taking the hidden elevator to the secret stash of energy weapons. There's a helpful close combat trick you should be using throughout the temple, and whenever it's necessary. Attack your foe just once, then use your remaining AP to run away. They'll follow you, but may not have enough AP to strike back, which will simplify things. You can even run them around in circles if they refuse to die quickly.

Masklinn adds: "Actually, the Temple of Trials mobs ants and scorpions can only walk 2 hexes and still be able to hit you. All you have to do is run 3 hexes away from them and you're safe. This means that a character with 9 AP can land two punches before you have to run, 10 AP granting you one Spear attack and one punch, or one kick and one punch. So basically a character at or above Agility 8 will do the temple a tad faster and easier. Critical failures are disabled for the first five days. From now on I won't comment on this unless there are noteworthy items to pick up, but you should search all the bookcases, shelves, bookshelves, dressers, desks, lockers, chests, footlockers, fridges, ice chests, bones, pots, tables, stuff, workbenches, tool boards, wall safes, floor safes, ammo crates, poor boxes, pool tables, mining machines, iguana stands, boxes, crates and other searchable containers as you progress through the game.

After a while you learn to recognize searchable objects on sight. Hard-core gamers will search all of them and take everything. In this game items on the ground or in corpses do not decay, so you can return and pick them up later on unless they're on a map you can't return to which will, eventually, be true for all of Arroyo and the Temple of Trials. However, to pick up an item you must be able to click on it, so if a dropped item or a corpse is completely hidden by opaque scenery then it will be lost! On the second map your character will probably start spotting floor traps. If he or she doesn't, you can walk to and fro to make it happen, unless you have a woefully low PE.

Should you have the patience, disarm the traps for 25 xp each. If you're reckless and set off a trap, you can pick up the Sharpened Pole which nearly lodged in your chest or maybe did. To avoid the traps altogether, keep to the right-hand wall. At one point you're required to set an explosive charge found in a tall pot nearby in front of a door, which shouldn't be too difficult. Beware of the trap on the doorstep. Floor traps seldom appear alone. Apparently, even in hi-tech military installations devilishly inconspicuous pressure plates are used to trigger traps. You'd have thought they could use, I don't know, motion or IR sensors instead. If you fail critically while disarming a floor trap it will say that you accidentally set off the trap; this is not strictly true, as the trap often does not go off, but you can't attempt to disarm it again.

You can set the timer on the explosives in your inventory and then drop it, or another way is to put it in an active item slot, leave the inventory window and use it from there; you'll then drop it automatically. Even with a puny Traps skill you can set the timer to the minimum of 10 seconds and run clear before the bomb goes off, whether you get the "explosive detonates prematurely" message or not.

You can open a lot of doors and forcefields in the game using explosives, grenades or rockets, and also unlock containers, but you shouldn't make a habit out of it. Some weak doors can be kicked in or smashed with any weapon, but those are never locked anyway. Normal doors can only be destroyed by explosive damage, so Bozar blasts and Super Sledge wallops are out. Sturdy doors need three blasts to destroy them, so I wouldn't bother, and many hi-tech doors can be expected to resist this kind of assault indefinitely. On some maps you can use a Crowbar from inventory to unlock containers even with a modest ST, but on others it won't work. At the entrance to the inner sanctum you find Cameron, who represents your final test. There are three ways to get past him: Fight him unarmed after a conversation and without access to your Healing Powder for xp.

Steal his key and unlock the door behind his back for xp. Talk him out of fighting IN 4 required and Speech must be tagged for xp. Beware that even though he says it's not a battle to the death, it is - for you! He'll happily strike a killing blow even if you're at one Hit Point; you, on the other hand, have to beat 20 HP out of him at which point he'll end the fight. In the unlikely case that you happen to kill him you'll have to take the key and unlock the door still xp , but the villagers won't hold you accountable. If you fight him, afterwards you'll have to go back to the previous room where your belongings have been stashed in a chest.

Then go to the exit grid at the top. Cutscene alert! Warlord notes: "You can trick the Temple of Trials final trial nicely, if you drop the Spear before talking. You just have to watch out, because if you drop it too close to the man, he'll pick it up in his first round and whack you up pretty good. Players often get sick of the temple after starting too many games that didn't progress very far beyond it. Actually it won't affect your game in any serious way if you just run as quickly as you can to each exit.

You'll probably have to fight six or seven ants along the way, but that's it. As long as you don't have to fight Cameron the whole thing should be over in a couple of minutes. Personally I think the Temple of Trials is as much a part of the game as any other stage - and also serves to demonstrate the extreme range of playing experiences the game engine has to offer.

Arroyo "I wonder how my cousins in Arroyo are doing? I hope they're flourishing. Unless some rat-bastard slaughters them all. Klamath will already be on the world map. As good an opportunity as any to practise being polite. Like I said in the introduction, I'm assuming you want to do as much as possible of what's available to you, and this means you really won't be able to role-play either an inherently noble character or a terminally sarcastic one. The former because there are several quests where you'll get your best result doing something "bad" to begin with, then following up with something good, as well as other borderline or outright evil quests which are simply too neat to pass up. The latter because it's a well-known fact that in computer RPGs which let you play an "evil" or grouchy character, you'll ultimately be punished for doing so because if you tell everyone you meet how ugly they are, they won't give you quests or bonuses.

Such is life. You can always pretend you're role-playing a psychopath who acts nice outwardly because he knows it will suit his purposes, while all the time thinking of new ways to strangle people with their own intestines. If you attacked Klint or Cameron in the Temple of Trials section, everyone will be hostile when you arrive here. You can run to the exit of the village before they can kill you, but then the game will end. The game will also come to a stop if you manage to end combat for instance by running to the hunting grounds and rest until midnight. Same thing happens should you ever attack anyone in Arroyo or even off them with Super Stimpaks , so don't. Using the Steal skill on any of the unarmed wandering villagers and passing a Steal check will lower your karma even if you don't take anything they have nothing to take.

This can mess up your dealings with Hakunin, so watch out. On special dates your Pipboy will say things like "Happy New Year! Ain't that cute. It also has its own screen saver which shows falling bombs. The nutty old shaman Hakunin will heal you to full HP and remove poison for free at any time, providing your karma is not negative. Talk to the not-so-bright Feargus by the well, then fix it Repair for xp. This can be done no matter how low your Repair skill. It might have something to do with Black Isle director Feargus MacRae Urquhart; there are close to a dozen names in these games derived from his including Cassidy's original name, which shows up if you sell him to Metzger.

Names of other developers abound, but none of them sticks out as much. He has a bag of Healing Powder, so take it and leave him with a few useless Scorpion Tails instead, since you probably can't carry them all into the desert anyway. If you want to barter, do it before the training. Depending on your starting skill you might want to get Lucas' bonus first.

In case you forgot your stuff in the temple, or you have a craving to bash some helpless left-over scorpions, you can re-enter the temple by taking the northern exit grid to the front entrance or by entering the cave beside Cameron. Thus values given in the guide may not always exactly correspond to what you actually end up with. Because of a bug you need to get Cameron's training before talking to Hakunin at all.

During the game you'll see four Hakunin dream sequences, which will befall you on 23 Oct , 21 Jan , 21 Apr and 20 Jul When you leave Vault 13 after getting the xp for finding it no matter if you got the G. As time passes the garden and fields will go empty and people will become generally despairing. After 90 days, which corresponds to the first Hakunin dream sequence, you will be unable to get or to finish, if you already got them quests 1, 3 and 4, and Hakunin won't give you healing or make Healing Powder any more. After 91 days you'll be unable to get the Water Flask and cash from the Elder. If you return to Arroyo after seeing the fourth Hakunin dream sequence, the bridge will be destroyed and the village inaccessible.

A dying Hakunin will greet you with a story of how the villagers were taken south in vertibirds, and Navarro appears on your world map. You don't have to return here and whether you do or not has basically no effect on the rest of the game. If you find Vault 13 but don't enter it, Arroyo won't change, but Hakunin's description and dialogue will! This should be a pretty rare occurrence, but it did happen to me once. Hakunin won't actually die after you talk to him, and it won't put Navarro on your world map.

Another funny thing is that if you're in Arroyo when you get the fourth vision and talk to Nagor, he'll tell you that Morlis cooked Smoke The Arroyo bridge location will actually change to a whole new map, so if your car is parked there at the time it will be lost forever, along with any NPCs left on that map or any other Arroyo map. Rescue Nagor's dog, Smoke, from the wilds. Nagor is to the east of Hakunin's garden, the dog is in the hunting grounds area to the west. Go there, kill any hostile geckos or Sneak past them , grab all the Broc Flowers and Xander Roots you can get, and avoid stepping on the green slime.

When you get to the dog at the top left it'll follow you back and even help you kill geckos on the way. The flowers and geckos reset every day if you leave the map and return. It may seem like an idea to stay here and level up from killing geckos, but actually it's much more work than it's worth, so only do that if you're close to levelling up already and can't wait or see the note below. You get xp for returning the dog alive. If you tell Nagor the dog died, he'll run off on his own to look for it unless you ask him not to, and he'll also take off if you turn down the quest.

If you then follow him to the hunting grounds, he'll be lying dead next to a dead gecko, the dog will be gone, and you can't strike the quest off your quest list. But you can take a Spear from Nagor's cold body. Zuger's patented levelling technique: "The easiest way to get xp from stealing is from the drugged-up geckos in Arroyo. Just plant and steal Broc Flowers. Easiest way to level up early on in the game. Gets a bit tedious though. In combat, all normal and golden geckos will run for and eat any Iguana-on-a-stick or Meat Jerky dropped on the ground, attacking if they have any AP left. They will also pick up punching weapons like Spiked Knuckles and Power Fists!

And then use them against you! This is only the first of many quests, dialogues and details which will be unavailable if your Intelligence is less than 4. I won't bother to tell you about that any more, but I will note where there are special benefits or odd happenings to be gained from being stupid. Find Vic the Trader. This won't happen for a little while yet.

If you're curious, see the Den, quest 8. Obtain flint to have Mynoc sharpen your spear. Talk to the guard by the bridge on the village perimeter. If you have at least PE 6 you can ask him about his spear, and he'll send you to your grumpy aunt to get some Flint. You can: Buy it from her in dialogue with 3 Healing Powder. Barter one Scorpion Tail for it. Steal it. Get caught stealing twice and she'll give it to you. If you got it by bartering, stealing or getting caught stealing you can still get the xp for using Speech, or even another piece of Flint by trading Healing Powder, but there's no use for two.

When you return to Mynoc he turns one of your Spears into a Sharpened Spear, which is good. Better yet, drop all your Spears beforehand and he'll give you a new one. Tribals are kinda stupid. After you've been to Klamath or the Den, Mynoc's dialogue changes so you can't get or finish the quest. Geoffrey Bateman reports a cheat with far-reaching applications: "When you talk to Aunt Morlis and try to get the Flint from her, get to the screen where you have the option of saying something like, 'Sure, I have 3 healing powders right here', then go to the barter screen, drop all your Healing Powders, go back to the talk screen, and select that dialogue option.

You get the Flint without losing anything the game only checks your inventory before displaying the dialogue option, not after you select it , then you just have to pick up your Powders. It also works with upgrading weapons. Just get to the screen where you choose the specific weapon to be upgraded, then switch to barter and drop the gun before selecting it to be upgraded; you'll get the upgraded weapon full of ammo, of course from the person, then you can pick up your non-upgraded gun. Unfortunately, this won't work with Algernon, who won't barter, so you have to pay for the upgrade to make this work. This trick might also be useful in situations where you pay someone through a dialogue choice, like paying Metzger for Vic: drop all your money, then 'pay' him, pick up your money Sebastian Cassten who also told me about the trick notes that you can use it to keep quest items such as the above-mentioned Flint , although this will appeal exclusively to item hoarders.

Kill the evil plants that infest Hakunin's garden. Talk to Hakunin and agree to kill the plants, or just go and kill them. They shouldn't be too much of a problem. You gain xp. Since it's possible you won't return here, scout the hunting grounds until you have an equal number of roots and flowers, then turn them all into powder. Do keep any roots and flowers you find in the future, though, since you'll get another chance to make use of them and until you get the first dream sequence you can always return and enlist Hakunin's skills again.

The ranged attack of the plants is considerably less dangerous than their bite plus they run out of spikes pretty quickly , so a good gardening technique is to hit them once, run away two hexes and end turn, then move in and repeat. If you have negative karma or if you've offended Hakunin, he'll offer this quest as a way of making amends. In the former case you still have to get your karma to 0 or better before he will give you the reward. In the latter case, keep insulting him until his reaction level drops so low that he forgets he's mad at you bug. After that he'll offer normal dialogue, although the talking head looks none too happy.

This won't happen for a long while yet unless you're using stupid short cut techniques. You gain xp when you first lay hands on a G. Klamath "Most people have evil spirits. You have stupid spirits. Go see shaman, get hole in head Read the notice board to get a feel of what's going down. You can also talk to the town greeter, but he wants cash and it's a waste unless this is your first game Or not.

In Klamath you find your first shops, one in the Golden Gecko and one at the Buckners' place, which both restock every 2 days. The Gecko is a rough place where trappers hang out you need a low or middling town reputation to crash here , while Buckner House is a tad friendlier. Stimpaks are in all likelihood not worth the price right now. Sajag at the Golden Gecko will give you a discount if you're charming enough, or if you just keep bugging him about it.

I'd practice my healing skills instead. Shops usually restock every days, randomly decided exceptions will be noted in the walkthrough. It won't happen while you're on the same map though sometimes if you talk repeatedly to a shopkeeper they may reveal a weapon they were holding back for personal use , and also items won't accumulate endlessly. Items that a storekeeper keeps in regular stock will fluctuate in number and choice items may not appear at all , but anything else you sell them will remain. Usually when you kill a shopkeeper, their inventory appears on their corpse even if you couldn't steal it off them previously, but not always.

Of course, if you kill Maida Buckner or Sajag you'll have to fight the rest of Klamath as well. Most shops in the game restocked significantly less often in v1. The patch notes only mention they get money more often, but it goes for the rest of their inventory as well. You never lose anything by converting unwanted items into cash, so you should take every opportunity to do so. This is because your items always sell for the same value; Barter levels, discounts and so on all affect the prices of the other party's goods. The Arroyo bridge location will actually change to a whole new map, so if your car is parked there at the time it will be lost forever, along with any NPCs left on that map or any other Arroyo map.

Rescue Nagor's dog, Smoke, from the wilds. Nagor is to the east of Hakunin's garden, the dog is in the hunting grounds area to the west. Go there, kill any hostile geckos or Sneak past them , grab all the Broc Flowers and Xander Roots you can get, and avoid stepping on the green slime. When you get to the dog at the top left it'll follow you back and even help you kill geckos on the way. The flowers and geckos reset every day if you leave the map and return. It may seem like an idea to stay here and level up from killing geckos, but actually it's much more work than it's worth, so only do that if you're close to levelling up already and can't wait or see the note below.

You get xp for returning the dog alive. If you tell Nagor the dog died, he'll run off on his own to look for it unless you ask him not to, and he'll also take off if you turn down the quest. If you then follow him to the hunting grounds, he'll be lying dead next to a dead gecko, the dog will be gone, and you can't strike the quest off your quest list. But you can take a Spear from Nagor's cold body. Zuger's patented levelling technique: "The easiest way to get xp from stealing is from the drugged-up geckos in Arroyo.

Just plant and steal Broc Flowers. Easiest way to level up early on in the game. Gets a bit tedious though. In combat, all normal and golden geckos will run for and eat any Iguana-on-a-stick or Meat Jerky dropped on the ground, attacking if they have any AP left. They will also pick up punching weapons like Spiked Knuckles and Power Fists! And then use them against you! This is only the first of many quests, dialogues and details which will be unavailable if your Intelligence is less than 4. I won't bother to tell you about that any more, but I will note where there are special benefits or odd happenings to be gained from being stupid.

Find Vic the Trader. This won't happen for a little while yet. If you're curious, see the Den, quest 8. Obtain flint to have Mynoc sharpen your spear. Talk to the guard by the bridge on the village perimeter. If you have at least PE 6 you can ask him about his spear, and he'll send you to your grumpy aunt to get some Flint. You can: Buy it from her in dialogue with 3 Healing Powder. Barter one Scorpion Tail for it. Steal it. Get caught stealing twice and she'll give it to you. If you got it by bartering, stealing or getting caught stealing you can still get the xp for using Speech, or even another piece of Flint by trading Healing Powder, but there's no use for two. When you return to Mynoc he turns one of your Spears into a Sharpened Spear, which is good.

Better yet, drop all your Spears beforehand and he'll give you a new one. Tribals are kinda stupid. After you've been to Klamath or the Den, Mynoc's dialogue changes so you can't get or finish the quest. Geoffrey Bateman reports a cheat with far-reaching applications: "When you talk to Aunt Morlis and try to get the Flint from her, get to the screen where you have the option of saying something like, 'Sure, I have 3 healing powders right here', then go to the barter screen, drop all your Healing Powders, go back to the talk screen, and select that dialogue option. You get the Flint without losing anything the game only checks your inventory before displaying the dialogue option, not after you select it , then you just have to pick up your Powders.

It also works with upgrading weapons. Just get to the screen where you choose the specific weapon to be upgraded, then switch to barter and drop the gun before selecting it to be upgraded; you'll get the upgraded weapon full of ammo, of course from the person, then you can pick up your non-upgraded gun. Unfortunately, this won't work with Algernon, who won't barter, so you have to pay for the upgrade to make this work. This trick might also be useful in situations where you pay someone through a dialogue choice, like paying Metzger for Vic: drop all your money, then 'pay' him, pick up your money Sebastian Cassten who also told me about the trick notes that you can use it to keep quest items such as the above-mentioned Flint , although this will appeal exclusively to item hoarders.

Kill the evil plants that infest Hakunin's garden. Talk to Hakunin and agree to kill the plants, or just go and kill them. They shouldn't be too much of a problem. You gain xp. Since it's possible you won't return here, scout the hunting grounds until you have an equal number of roots and flowers, then turn them all into powder. Do keep any roots and flowers you find in the future, though, since you'll get another chance to make use of them and until you get the first dream sequence you can always return and enlist Hakunin's skills again.

The ranged attack of the plants is considerably less dangerous than their bite plus they run out of spikes pretty quickly , so a good gardening technique is to hit them once, run away two hexes and end turn, then move in and repeat. If you have negative karma or if you've offended Hakunin, he'll offer this quest as a way of making amends. In the former case you still have to get your karma to 0 or better before he will give you the reward. In the latter case, keep insulting him until his reaction level drops so low that he forgets he's mad at you bug. After that he'll offer normal dialogue, although the talking head looks none too happy. This won't happen for a long while yet unless you're using stupid short cut techniques.

You gain xp when you first lay hands on a G. Klamath "Most people have evil spirits. You have stupid spirits. Go see shaman, get hole in head Read the notice board to get a feel of what's going down. You can also talk to the town greeter, but he wants cash and it's a waste unless this is your first game Or not. In Klamath you find your first shops, one in the Golden Gecko and one at the Buckners' place, which both restock every 2 days. The Gecko is a rough place where trappers hang out you need a low or middling town reputation to crash here , while Buckner House is a tad friendlier. Stimpaks are in all likelihood not worth the price right now. Sajag at the Golden Gecko will give you a discount if you're charming enough, or if you just keep bugging him about it.

I'd practice my healing skills instead. Shops usually restock every days, randomly decided exceptions will be noted in the walkthrough. It won't happen while you're on the same map though sometimes if you talk repeatedly to a shopkeeper they may reveal a weapon they were holding back for personal use , and also items won't accumulate endlessly. Items that a storekeeper keeps in regular stock will fluctuate in number and choice items may not appear at all , but anything else you sell them will remain.

Usually when you kill a shopkeeper, their inventory appears on their corpse even if you couldn't steal it off them previously, but not always. Of course, if you kill Maida Buckner or Sajag you'll have to fight the rest of Klamath as well. Most shops in the game restocked significantly less often in v1. The patch notes only mention they get money more often, but it goes for the rest of their inventory as well. You never lose anything by converting unwanted items into cash, so you should take every opportunity to do so. This is because your items always sell for the same value; Barter levels, discounts and so on all affect the prices of the other party's goods.

But one of their dollars always trades for a dollar's worth of equipment. This is also useful to know when you're buying something expensive and can't carry all the junk you'd like to trade in for it; just pay in cash, and then trade in stuff for that cash at your leisure. Note however that most shopkeepers restock money along with their other wares, at which time any amount of cash in excess of what they usually carry will disappear. Don't fret though, it's all there; the dialogue interface shows up to seven digits, and the variable itself can in fact go over 2 billion. In Buckner House a tribal-looking person by the name of Sulik is standing about. Turns out he was looking for his sister who was taken by slavers , but got drunk in Klamath, wrecked the place and is working off his tab.

Do this in conversation with Sulik, though, because then you get xp that you won't get if you pay the money directly to Maida. There's a better way to free Sulik: see quests 2 and 6 below. It's a good idea to do this as early as possible when you come to Klamath, so you can have Sulik tag along. This isn't one of those stupid games where experience is divided among party members! The first thing you should do is take Sulik's Leather Jacket and wear it yourself to look cool. Always choose the second line in this conversation, and eventually you gain xp and Sulik if you want him and providing your CH is not 1, of course.

Since stupid characters don't get to do quests 2 or 6 this is your only chance to get him! Sebastian Cassten notes that you can repeatedly pay the sum for Sulik's release by asking Maida about the Den. Basically you're paying to increase your town reputation. There's a dog around. Talk to it, and if you feed it some Meat Jerky you'll gain a Trapper Town Key and the dog will follow you around the map for as long as you don't leave the map it will actually be your ally in any fight you start here. Strange thing for a dog to be chewing on, really. Don't talk to the dog until you have something to feed it, or you may end up having to fight it running off the map will calm it; if you kill the dog you don't get the key.

Visit Vic's old shack in the northeastern part of the map and get among other things his Radio. It will come in handy later on. In your first game, using the Pipe Rifle will probably seem like a really cool idea, but it's not very efficient, so save your ammo until you have the 10mm Pistol. Or if Small Guns is your only decent combat skill, might as well snipe rats in Trapper Town until you find the 10mm Pistol. Good, cruel fun. You can sleep with the women in the bathhouse, if you pay that is. Sally won't talk to you if you double-crossed the Duntons at the pastures, but you're not missing much.

One of the girls, Jenny, is a friend of Vic's. Talk to her you don't have to sleep with her first and she'll put the Den on your world map. Maida Buckner, Sajag and Whiskey Bob can all do this, too. He can put the Den on your map if you ask him about Vic before accepting quest 3. He'll also offer free accommodation same effect as described above , but not until after you've accepted or declined the quest, and since Torr doesn't return to the town map if you finish quest 3 properly a stupid character wouldn't normally get that option anyway. In the unpatched game Maida puts Redding on your map along with the Den. The wicked Dunton brothers live in a house north of the square. At night they walk over to the Golden Gecko, which means you can loot their house.

Talking to people and doing some of the quests below, you find out the Duntons are really scum. You can confront them about stolen cattle, but sadly there's no way of turning them in, and if you talk them into a fight the whole town including the Buckners will join in on their side. Attacking and killing the Duntons won't turn the rest of the town permanently hostile, though, so if you lock the door before attacking you'll be able to end combat afterwards and nobody will carry a grudge running to an exit grid will have the same effect.

The Duntons will each spawn a Spiked Knuckles in their first combat round unless they already have one. You can make this happen just by entering combat mode and clicking turn, then using Steal to get them, and repeat. The first Dunton you kill will carry their "shop" inventory which is pretty pointless and restocks only every 3 weeks unless you did it on the brahmin pastures map.

If you kill one of the Duntons, the other one will have disappeared after you leave the map and return. For instance, if you assassinate one then immediately talk to the other and take the rustling job, none of them will show up on the pastures map which means you cannot finish the quest. If you try to search the bookcase while they're in the house or if they see you in the side room, the Duntons will attack immediately. Usually though, possessive critters will give you one warning that you should stay away from certain containers, doors or exits.

To do this they must be able to see you, so you can try Sneaking, or positioning yourself out of their line of sight. If you have NPCs you can use them as cover, as they seem to block line of sight completely for this purpose. However, don't blame me if these critters have a double take and come for you later! Early in the game you may want to save before picking any important door if your Lockpick skill is not too high. A critical failure will jam the lock, which then cannot be opened until the next day, i.

At least you never have to worry about Lockpicks breaking. Should you ever be disappointed that unlocked doors don't give you any xp, you can instead lock them for 25 xp. Great fun, eh? If you're playing without children, here in Klamath is where you'll hear your first disembodied voices. When it happened to me the first time, I thought it was my own character talking to the dog! Trapper Town is the western part of Klamath. If he says something about your tribe being "mostly farmers", just try again. This will add a percentage number equal to double your Intelligence but not less than 7. If you turn him down after he states his price you won't get another chance. Before the patch Picket wouldn't give you money, but he wouldn't take it, either.

The current state of affairs is the result of a "fix" mentioned in the patch notes. It turns out Slim's shut off access to the northern part of the area due to rat encroachment. To pass the locked door, you can: Pick the door for the usual 25 xp. Steal the key from Slim. Use the key you got from the dog earlier. Convince Slim he should let you have the key for any of several reasons. Sleep with him if you're a woman. Toss Aldo's Molotov Cocktail at the door. Take the key from Slim's cold, dead body. Get the key from Slim right away if your IN is below 4. If you're a woman and tell Slim you'd "give anything" to get the key, the lines of dialogue you get are messed up.

What they do is, respectively: agree to his proposal, back up the dialogue, and leave dialogue. If you should select the first by mistake you can console yourself with the fact that the script never calls the sex procedure, so technically speaking there's just a fade-out So much for security. Wend your way through the complex to the north picking up the boots and ammo from the lockers until you find a hole in the floor, and climb down. You'll now find yourself fighting through three cavernous levels with pretty much rat in them.

Several minor items are hidden on the ground including a Sledgehammer, there's a 10mm Pistol probably your first half-decent weapon on a trapper corpse and a Combat Knife in the rat nest, and you can find a Tool by a scattered robot corpse in one corner. Near the southwest corner of the second lowermost level there's a caved-in section; move the mouse around above the big pile of bones and you'll find some 10mm JHP ammo. Take the Nuka-Cola from the ground and loot the fridge to the northeast, but most importantly walk over to the car and pick up the Fuel Cell Regulator, which is worth "invisible" xp.

Near the car there's a working Nuka-Cola machine. Use a coin on it and you get a Nuka-Cola, and possibly hit for points of damage by the violently ejected bottle. There are plenty of these machines in the game working and broken ones have different descriptions , and you can get bottles from each before they run out of stock. However, Nuka-Cola is an ingredient for making Super Stimpaks later on, so you may want to keep this in mind, though chances are you'll have plenty more than you'll ever need anyway.

Strangely enough, these machines replenish their stock every weeks. If you can't find the 10mm Pistol it's probably because you left the rat caves in order to rest up, during which time the corpse disappeared leaving the gun obscured by the remaining pool of blood. While bodies decay in mere hours if you leave a map and return, blood is quite persistent and can literally remain for years. The specifics of blood decay are not known to me, but it appears to depend on time as well as the number of times the map has been entered.

On the floor of the first level of tunnels there are Rocks. Rocks, man, Rocks! Here is the Rock challenge: how many Rocks can one gather through the course of a game, without resorting to recurring random encounters? I'll keep you up to date on the Rock situation Refuel the still. Go to the southeastern exit grid into a wooded area full of geckos. Make your way down to the shack to the southwest, grab one of the Firewood heaps and use it on the still for xp. When you return to Bob, he'll give you your agreed-upon monetary reward. Because the golden geckos can be a definite pain and because of the issue of pelts, you may not want to do this until you've got both Sulik and the Gecko Skinning perk see below.

You must do this before you collect your reward from Bob, so you have to choose your allegiance. You can ask Sajag to tell you about his booze connections in the Den, but it doesn't do anything once you get there. This is one of the few timed quests in the game. Like the man says, you need to refuel the still within a day or you don't get any xp from doing so, but you can go to Sajag after Bob gives you the what for. Whiskey Bob won't talk to you if your town reputation is Neutral and your karma is -3 or worse. To remedy this all you have to do is nudge your town reputation in either direction, which should be easy enough buying a round of drinks will do it.

This is the result of a bug: he was supposed to snub you off if you have a negative town reputation, but instead the script checks the global variable with the same identifier as the current Klamath town reputation. Here you may run into your first golden geckos, who radiate you when they hit you. I would suggest you don't use any RadAway before leaving Klamath and the Toxic Caves altogether, since we're not talking high levels of radiation. See the end of the Character Design section for more detailed info on radiation. Under most circumstances you should be perfectly safe not taking any RadAway before you get to the doctor in Vault City or ever, barring some extreme happening such as ending up in the Toxic waste dump repeatedly.

Rescue Smiley the Trapper. She'll put the Toxic Caves on the world map for you and ask you to find Smiley. If he says you already know more about hunting than he does, persist and you'll get the bonus anyway. If you have Gecko Skinning, every gecko you kill except the fire variety will have a pelt in it which you can grab and sell. Should Smiley perish then Ardin won't talk to you any more if you tell her. You can get double xp for this quest if you get the location of the caves from Mrs Buckner but say you can't help her.

Then go and rescue Smiley. When you return to Klamath Ardin will still be talking about him, so you can accept the quest, go to the caves and rescue Smiley again, then go back to Klamath for your reward. There will be two Smileys in Klamath, each of which will give you training. For this to work, you cannot enter the Toxic Caves in between saving the first Smiley and reactivating the quest, not even by saving and loading the game.

Also you may want to avoid talking to the first Smiley directly after getting the quest, since he will then start following you around Klamath thinking you're in the caves. Sebastian Cassten adds: "You can actually gain xp for recruiting Sulik. First do one of Ardin's quests and ask either for no reward or for Sulik's freedom so that you get xp. Now before going to Maida, talk to Sulik. You will notice that he isn't free yet 'cause you haven't talked to Maida. You can now if you want to pay the bucks for an additional xp reward. If you agree to search for Torr before you get the quest to find Smiley, you must resolve quest 6 before you can get this one.

Guard the brahmin. Torr who's not so smart wants help guarding his herd of cattle from "bugmen" who come at night. Don't talk to him until you're ready, because he'll only ask you once but see quest 4 for an additional way of getting this quest. Agree to help and you're teleported to a wooded area where the brahmin are to be found. A radscorpion appears, which you should be able to take out easily. Is this the truth behind Torr's insectoid bugmen, I wonder? Nearby there are several more, if you kill every one of them you'll have completed this quest for xp, but if you want to switch to quest 4 instead, don't kill them for now. There's another, less obvious way of finishing this quest.

Two shady figures are standing to the west of Torr's camp, namely the Dunton brothers. Approach them and they'll ask you for help stealing the cattle this will activate quest 4. Agree to do so, but then tell the Duntons to call off the plan Speech check needed , after which they run off. Optionally kill the scorpions for combat xp. In a shack to the southwest you can find a pair of Radscorpion Limbs, which have been used by the Duntons to masquerade as bugmen to get at Torr's cattle. Sadly there's no way to confront them about this a snippet of such dialogue exists, but is unused , so the Limbs are worthless. Beware that once you leave this map you can't get back to it, so don't leave anything here and bring all the scorp tails you can carry.

Sebastian Cassten notes that after you scare off the Duntons you can tell Torr to run away as well see quest 4. This will let you get quest 6, which is really supposed to happen only if you finish quest 4 instead. It also has the aesthetic effect of crossing out both brahmin quests in the Pipboy, although you never get the reward for quest 4. It's possible to get xp for this quest twice. After you scare off the Duntons you can go to Torr and tell him you'll help guard the brahmin, which will reactivate the quest.

Now kill the scorpions and leave and you'll get another xp. This way you won't get quest 6, though. Sebastian Cassten has also discovered that you can pull off both the above tricks by relying on a combination of script imperfections. Convince the Duntons to run off, then kill the scorpions. Talk to Torr, but instead of using the mouse to navigate through dialogue, keep it still. Press 2 and 1 to trick him. When dialogue ends, immediately click to talk to him again, and select option 1 this time. Now your goal is to run to the exit grid in combat mode; do this by using all but one of your AP each time, ending combat manually and hitting A a lot.

You will be successful if you get there before Torr manages to disappear which will be signalled by a fade-out. Killing a cow or turning Torr hostile will make this quest fail. Rustle the brahmin. Might as well clean out the scorpions afterwards, though you don't get any quest xp for doing so. This would have been a better idea than quest 3 considering quest 6 below, but since you can get that anyway this is mostly for nasty characters. You can also get this quest by talking to the Duntons in town instead of Torr, providing you didn't go and get yourself a good town reputation.

You only get one chance for each brother to ask for work, and once you ask, if you turn one of them down you don't get a proper chance with the other see bug note below. Don't address them by name, since it may abort the work thread which twin you're talking to is decided randomly each time. When you arrive at the pastures, you can talk to Torr and promise to help him guard the brahmin to activate quest 3, and then choose which one to complete as usual. Remember that once you tell Torr to take a hike, you can't finish quest 3 by killing the scorpions, and that if you kill the scorpions the Duntons will leave even if you didn't collect their reward yet.

If you leave the pastures without completing either quest 3 or 4, you don't get quest 6 or any xp, so that just plain sucks. If your Charisma is 10 when you enter Klamath for the first time, your town reputation will rise to the point where the Duntons won't offer you the rustling job. Arm-wrestling them once before asking will take care of this. Killing Torr or any of the brahmin will set the quest to failed and cause the Duntons to run off.

If you told Torr to run away and then attack the brahmin, you'll see a float over the invisible Torr after combat ends. This won't turn him hostile, though. From WraithUV: "Saving and then loading the game after you've scared off Torr causes the Duntons to no longer speak to you. This makes both quests impossible to complete. As found by Kwiatmen and figured out by Killap, completing this quest spawns a few new brahmin in the pen back of the Duntons' house which use Arroyo brahmin scripts.

Attacking these will spell the end of your game. If you talk to one Dunton about work in town and turn him down, then talk to the other and insist on helping them, the dialogue will proceed as if you were on the pastures map. You can agree to handle Torr; this won't take you to the pastures, though you can still get there by talking to Torr as usual. Or you can have a shot at spooking them, giving you the normal xp for that they won't actually run anywhere , after which you can go with Torr if you want, finding the pastures empty except for brahmin and scorpions. Another bug found by Ryan P.

Fialcowitz: "If you talk to the Duntons about work in Klamath prior to talking to Torr, Torr will disappear if you leave the map and come back. Slim in Trapper Town will tell you about this. You'll know Keeng Ra'at when you see him on the second level of the rat maze. Perhaps Sulik should be with you for this? You get quest xp for killing the royal rodent. Once you kill the rat you can't talk to Slim for training if you didn't already. Rescue Torr. If you told Torr to leave his brahmin earlier, now's the time to make up for it!

Go to Ardin Buckner and it turns out Torr is missing because he went to look for the brahmin. Finger the Duntons and offer to help you only get one chance. Then go to the canyon area to the northwest. Torr is standing about near a mad robot. Kill the bot using hit and run tactics, scout the area intriguing! If you run off the map after the robot attacks, it won't be hostile when you return. You can then use Repair to fix its broken motivator. There is no use for the Yellow Reactor Keycard in this game, despite numerous allegations, rumours and misunderstandings. It may be the seed of a quest which was not fully implemented, or perhaps it was simply meant to be a Yellow Pass Key, reflecting the Poseidon Oil connection.

Interestingly, the card is not there in the unpatched game. Toxic Caves "Pipin' hot gecko pie, comin' up. To be safe from harm, you and each party member must be carrying a pair of Rubber Boots in your inventory. However, for the heck of it you may want to do a little voluntary goo stepping. If you step on the goo repeatedly without protection, you'll soon get a message that your feet begin to itch. Eventually after 15 steps to be precise it'll say: "Your feet burn and itch for a while, but then they feel better.

And yes, this is the only way to get the toes I searched the scripts. If you came here in the car, it'll be on the edge of the screen and you can't access the trunk while you're here. Power Armor protects against the goo as if you're wearing boots. Hardened and Advanced Power Armor do not so you get the toes if you didn't already , but they nullify the damage. The boots have no effect on bad goo in other areas than this one.

Kill as many geckos as you need to in order to get past, and make sure to raid the locker for boots and stuff. Go down the ladder and make your way to the northeast avoid the middle tunnel, it has the most geckos. There you'll find an elevator, a broken generator, and a trapper. If this is your first visit you probably won't be able to do much about the first two, so talk to the third after raiding the locker on the wall, a container type which is easily overlooked.

Once you bring him to the cave mouth, he'll make it on his own and you earn xp. Then after you've been to Klamath and got the Gecko Skinning perk you can return here and take out any remaining geckos. Smiley will join you fighting the geckos even before you talk to him if you're right outside where he's standing. He's not overly effective, though. Next you'll have to use an Electronic Lockpick on the elevator door, or it won't open. Go down, kill the rocketbot, then loot, loot and loot to your heart's content: good ammo, a Bozar and a Combat Armor Mark II among other things. Though the first time I got down here, I was disappointed the place was so small. I'd expected a full-blown base.

This is the only time in the game you need any kind of lockpick item unless your Lockpick skills are horrendously bad. You'll want to kill the robot before it can take too many shots at you, which is where this little trick comes in handy. If you press and hold the A key as the game is loading a new area such as when you get a random encounter on the world map , you'll enter combat mode and get the first turn before any monsters can react. Kind of a half-cheat which takes advantage of the game engine. Another time you may want to use this is in dialogues where you say things like "Eat grapeshot and die, scumbag". The other party always gets to initiate combat - that is, unless you hold the A key as you leave dialogue.

In this particular case you can also use the trick to run past the robot before it can react; if you get to the doorway you'll be safe, even if there are NPCs in the robot's line of sight. If you ever wanted to have your very own Robo Rocket Launcher, you can. What you must do is kill the robot with a critical hit to the head that does no damage try using Flares, or maybe punching; Better Criticals is a must. Because of a bug this means you get no combat xp, but neither does the bot purge its inventory of special items you aren't really supposed to get your hands on.

Next you must knock an NPC unconscious on the same hex occupied by the rocketbot make sure it's not Vic, Myron or Goris, since they will freak out if looted while unconscious - assuming you care, that is , access their inventory, and finally click an arrow to select the robot. You should now be looking at two purple boxes representing one Robo Rocket Launcher and up to 18 rounds of Robo Rocket Ammo which are equivalent to Explosive Rockets. This weapon has a very modest ST requirement and takes only half as many AP to fire as a normal Rocket Launcher, but it doesn't do nearly as much damage.

The Den "You'll not find a greater hive of scum and villainy. Now where did I hear that? The Den is divided into two areas, eastern and western. Both are full of foggy chem reliants, who may sometimes attack you unprovoked. If you hurt them somewhat they run away so you don't have to kill them, or you can probably run away yourself and then end combat. Actually you can kill them with no karma drop or other consequences, but don't make a habit of it. You can access the unimplemented Den area by pressing 3 when choosing your destination on the town map. You can whack Anna's double, get a Shovel from Smitty's evil twin's shack, and in case you're wondering, if you kill everyone here no one in the "real" Den will care.

The two kids outside Ananias' house are the only exceptions. Running past them won't help as their steal action is instantaneous, even if you see them working their steal animation on the screen only after you're already safely past and if you fail a PE check you don't even see the animation. You might be able to Sneak past them, or another trick is to enter combat mode, go past them and end combat.

Thankfully they don't steal from your party members. If you don't want to bother with entering combat mode, simply walk up to the kids you need to pass, let them try to steal, then use your own Steal skill on them one at a time to see if they got anything. If they did, use Steal on them repeatedly to get it back; they won't run off to sell the item until you move away, and if they catch you, nothing happens. You'll then be safe from these specific thieves for minutes usually enough time to be in and out of the building. If you don't get an item back, the kid will run to the nearest shopkeeper and fence it those outside Becky's will cross the street to Tubby , in which case you'll have to trade for it if you want it back. If the shopkeeper a specific kid would fence their stolen goods to is killed, the kid will just stand there accumulating items until you leave the map, whereupon their loot disappears.

It can get a little bizarre, looking at their inventory. A kid who can carry a couple of Bozars should be able to make a living doing something else, no? Outdoorsman: Can be raised with books, although those are rare. Mostly good for avoiding annoying random encounters. Rather pointless skills: Throwing: Rocks and grenades simply don't play a huge role in the world of Fallout 2. Sneak: I'm sorry, but I don't see the point of sneaking past people when you can just blow them up instead or maybe that's the point, you sneak up and plant dynamite?

Unfortunately there's not enough dynamite to employ this tactic consistently. Steal: Don't bother unless either you don't mind if everyone turns hostile on you, or you plan to save and reload a lot which isn't my favoured playing style. If you really must steal something, you can usually do it with a low skill level saving first, of course. Barter: Early in the game there won't be a whole lot to buy. Later in the game you'll be swimming in money. Don't waste a single skill point here. Gambling: See Barter. Your amount of unspent skill points is capped at 99 when you level up. You can have more than 99 points stored e. Afterwards return the difficulty setting to normal or whatever. This also works when reading books; see the Items section for a note on this.

Similarly you can set the difficulty to easy to raise your skills temporarily for a specific action again assuming you're playing on normal or hard. Some players actually favour the Sneak skill as in some situations it will let you kill people without anyone noticing, which is useful in assassinations. It can also be useful for HtH characters to get as close to the enemy as possible before they open fire.

It doesn't much help with stealing, though, as in almost every shop where the wares are kept in an onscreen container the script simply doesn't take sneaking into account. I'll put a couple of Steal notes here, because they don't seem to fit anywhere else. You gain a bonus or suffer a smaller penalty stealing from the back or side of someone, but the Sneak skill does nothing.

Item size which is not the same as weight is a factor unless you have the Pickpocket perk. Regardless of your skill level you can use Steal to see what humanoid critters are carrying, although you won't see items they're holding or items that they "produce" during the course of a quest. However, the total amount will cap out at minus your Steal level, and if you're caught you get none at all.

Low-level thief characters can benefit from this by stealing "one coin at a time" from potential victims or swapping an item back and forth. Personally I'd try to think of something more meaningful to do. In the latter case wares will appear on the body of the shopkeeper only if you kill them, and perhaps not even then. Starseeker adds this on Steal: "I have found out that if you have low Lockpick skills, you can try to steal stuff from locked drawers or tables, but it may not always work for some reason. It won't work on lockers. You can plant items on people using Steal. The only use of this feature I know of, except giving equipment to your NPCs, is to arm an explosive, put it on someone, then whistle innocently and walk away a bit.

But don't save your game before it goes off; it's been reported that this can corrupt your save slot completely! A tip from Masklinn: "Some people don't show their weapons sometimes other items, but mainly weapons in the thieving interface but accept to barter them. Just enter the barter interface, put the weapon in the trading area, then go back and quit dialogue; quite a lot of people will have put the item where you can see it in the thieving interface and you can now steal it. Unarmed is an exception if you make use of the HtH Evade perk, though at high levels you'll have to spend quite a lot of skill points for each point of AC.

Most often you can just try again if you fail a skill check, even in dialogue. Perks The three top perks, hands down: Awareness: Extremely useful. This should be your first perk which means you should always start with a minimum PE of 5. Sniper: The sniper perk which will allow you to take on opponents like the Navarro and Enclave troops confidently. In case you need to raise a stat with a perk in order to qualify for another perk, make sure you get this in time.

Ideally you should have a good idea when you start playing which perks to take at which level. If you don't have the stats to meet the requirements of a perk you can in some cases use drugs to raise them temporarily and get the perk, but this does not work with perks that have a Luck requirement, for instance. Check out the chems in the Items section for details. Also remember you must spend each perk before earning a new one. Some have asked me about Sniper and how it interacts with effects that modify your Critical Chance; specifically, the observation has been made that "Sniper and non-aimed" can produce less crits than "aimed and non-Sniper".

Basically this is correct for values of Luck below 6. How I think Sniper works, and which is borne out by shooting the pariah dog a great number of times, is that it doesn't replace your usual crit chance but instead adds an independent possibility of a critical hit. Sniper would still add something, though, in this case roughly equivalent to three levels of More Criticals. By contrast, the benefit of More Criticals fades to insignificance even at moderate LK if you have Sniper. Recommended perks number of ranks in parentheses : Action Boy 2 : Whether you need this, and if so how many levels, depends on your current Action Points and what weapons you plan to use.

Try to get an even multiple of your weapon's AP cost or a multiple plus reloading cost if ranged. Better Criticals: Yummy. Bonus HtH Attacks: Great for brawlers. HtH just isn't as efficient as ranged combat. Bonus Move 2 : A good early choice for HtH characters, and arguably pretty useful for anyone. Otherwise don't bother, it will only net you a few skill points. Living Anatomy: Very good, 5 more damage per attack and Doctor points although you may not need them at this stage. Quick Pockets: Actually this is a break early in the game when you find yourself needing Stimpaks or Healing Powder at times, and an overall convenience later on.

Another advantage is that you can get Bonus Move at 6th level, compared to 12th for Action Boy. I can never find any good perks at the early levels, so I almost always go for Toughness and Bonus Move. And some extra move AP can be still useful even in ranged combat - for hiding behind obstacles. Volcano adds: "I find Bonus Move has its uses in ranged combat, when using heavy burst weapons like miniguns or the Bozar.

It allows you to get a clear field of fire so that you can target the enemy without blowing apart your NPCs. And it allows you to line up critters to ensure hitting more than one with each burst. Wiping out six floaters with three bursts from a Vindicator is a lot of fun. Possibly useful but not crucial perks: Dodger: Protection is good. Explorer, Ranger, Scout: These all improve your chances of finding special encounters, which can be helpful if you have low LK and play on hard difficulty, but mostly for the fun value, so don't take them until the late game. Gain Charisma: This is useful if your new CH is an even number, which means you can recruit another party member Gain Intelligence: Unless you start out with IN 9 this is good, but not a top priority if you have IN already, which you should.

Gain Luck: Good LK will help with special encounters maybe and criticals, so take this in the late game if you can't think of anything else. Great only if you have the Sniper perk. Gain Perception: Improves your sniping and helps get the Sniper perk but you can use chems for that. As you can see all the Gain Foo perks are rather situational. Note that you can use unarmed weaponry such as the Power Fist with this perk, i.

Lifegiver 2 : You can accumulate a lot of Hit Points with this one, but after level 12, do you need them? Probably not. Magnetic Personality: For those situations where you have a lousy CH and want a large party anyway without fooling around with chems. If your current CH is an odd number then Gain Charisma is strictly superior to this. More Criticals 3 : Groovy, but the catch here is that if you get Sniper and have a good LK or Slayer, this perk will be made largely redundant. It then effectively becomes another Bonus Rate of Fire. Other than that, don't waste a perk changing traits in mid-game instead of choosing right to begin with. Silent Death: Considering the six separate requirements for pulling this off, you'd think it'd do more than double damage!

Toughness 3 : Protection is good but spending char points on Endurance is not, so take Buffout if you want this. Would be more noteworthy if it affected all damage types. Valiant Bastard notes: "When I choose the Gain Intelligence perk, the relevant skills go up to reflect that, but I don't gain any additional skill points when I move up a level. Note that this perk was changed after the manual was printed; the in-game description is the correct one. Frank Shannon is not alone when he says: "I'm a little surprised you rated Lifegiver so low.

However, by that time you'll have run around in heavy armour and with resistance bonuses for a good while and you seldom have to worry about being slain outright except by massive critical hits that bypass armour. Lifegiver could save you in such a moment - and so could Dodger, abstractly speaking. Meanwhile, offensive perks which add attacks, manoeuvrability or damage will be working for you constantly. I'd consider taking Lifegiver before I considered dumping more char points in Endurance, but I still find it limited in appeal. This perk is available from level 6, not level 3 as the manual states. If you have only one trait when you get the Mutate! Krum Stanoev adds: "There's another fairly obvious way to modify your primary stats in-game with the Mutate!

You can start with an Agility of 6 and still get Sniper: you pick Finesse, then you pick Gain Agility to make it 7, then Mutate! One could make an argument such as this: "If you use Mutate! That's got to be the best perk ever. The beauty of swapping Finesse and Fast Shot is that the benefit of Finesse and the drawback of Fast Shot disappear at the same time, namely when you get Sniper. It's possible to score more than one double-damage hit with Silent Death in the first round of combat, assuming you can position yourself behind two or more enemies without leaving Sneak mode which is difficult if you have to pass directly in front of them.

Now you'll have to get all three levels to notice any difference. Note that this perk adds to the maximum damage - that's only one point on average for each perk slot! Bonus Ranged Damage 2 : Not enough of a bonus unless you're using a Minigun, Bozar or the like although if you expect to score a lot of damage multiplication criticals it gets a little better. Gain Strength: You shouldn't need this to get to ST Pickpocket: Neat for thief characters, I suppose, but effectively a convenience perk unless you really never save before stealing.

Silent Running: If you must play a sneaking character I guess this takes a lot of frustration out of playing, but doesn't it spoil the atmosphere? Pure convenience. Smooth Talker 3 : Almost the equivalent of the Gain Intelligence perk, but not quite Better to start off with a decent IN instead, no? Thief: Pretty much the same for this. Since it gives you 40 skill points and you can get it at level 3 this is one of the best skill perks. Not that these thief skills are crucial or anything. Weapon Handling: Could be used to facilitate switching to Avenger Minigun or the like early in the game, but otherwise not needed unless your ST is way too low to begin with. Just spend some skill points to compensate. You can play a little trick with the Tag!

Effectively this perk can give you an amount of generic skill points at least equal to the highest amount you've gained in a non-tagged skill, and potentially much more, which makes it far superior to every other skill point perk. Although a favourite of some players, personally I think it's no big deal, since I don't care much for skill points late in the game anyway. When you pick a skill point perk other than Tag! Survivalist is probably the most likely candidate of the bunch, but it's still much inferior to Tag! This redistribution trick also works on a smaller scale when you buy a perk that raises a stat. Useless perks which should only be chosen if you have no other options or really want to : Adrenaline Rush: Gain an infinitesimal bonus, but first you'll have to be dying?

Let me think. Cautious Nature: Pointless for anyone but the most cowardly diplomats who can't think of anything else. Comprehension: What's the use if it doesn't raise the maximum skill level which can be reached using books? See Educated etc. Cult of Personality, Karma Beacon: These perks have no effect in the game. That's right, they do nothing. Take Adrenaline Rush or Light Step if you want a better perk than these two. Demolition Expert: So extremely marginal. Earlier Sequence 3 : Not worth it. Fixit, Negotiator, Salesman, Speaker, Survivalist: All these perks give you nothing but skill points. You don't need more skill points.

You need the cool perks listed in the sections above this one. Empathy: It seems like a great idea in theory, but this game simply isn't about choosing the dialogue options that keep other people happy. Faster Healing 3 , Healer 2 : Healing rate is never an issue. Fortune Finder, Master Trader: Money is not an issue. Fortune Finder is just awful; Master Trader isn't actively bad, just strictly unnecessary. Gain Endurance: Endurance is simply not important, and this does nothing if your EN is an even number. Lifegiver is tons better for HP.

Ghost: Like a skill point perk only you don't get the skill points! Heave Ho! Here and Now, Swift Learner 3 : These two help you gain levels. What's the primary purpose of gaining levels? To get perks. So why use perks to gain more levels? A sex perk is bound to be utterly marginal. Presence 3 : Don't bother. Extremely few critters treat you differently depending on reaction, and this perk isn't likely to be the factor that tips the scales in your favour. Light Step: Not enough traps to make this remotely worthwhile. Not even if it said "never" instead of "less likely". Mysterious Stranger: Utterly useless. Night Vision: Situational, and doesn't do much. Increase your weapon skill instead or pick Sharpshooter.

Pathfinder 2 : Time is not an issue in Fallout 2. Pyromaniac: Too marginal. Should have been a lot more damage to have been any fun. Also note that the Improved Flamer is the only weapon that does fire damage Molotov Cocktails do not, even though they have the "dancing death by fire" animation, and Flame Breaths don't count. Quick Recovery, Stonewall: Both mind-numbingly marginal.

Rad Resistance 2 , Snakeater 2 : Poison and radiation aren't common enough, or difficult enough to handle, to necessitate these small bonuses. Sharpshooter: Effectively just a minimal skill increase for all ranged attacks. Increase your preferred weapon skill instead and use the perk for something special. Kanhef explains Heave Ho! Someone with a Strength of 2 can throw things up to 6 hexes away. Taking Heave Ho! However, the maximum throwing range is 8 for spears, and 15 for grenades.

So raising Strength above 5 doesn't increase range at all. Characters with a Strength of 1 would benefit from this perk; it's completely useless with a Strength over 4. Both Heave Ho! Several other perks were changed for example, all skill point perks , but their proper descriptions are in the game. Here and Now gives you exactly the amount of xp needed to reach the next level; ideally it should be taken at a high level and after earning just enough xp to reach your current level.

Well, ideally it should not be taken, but you know what I mean. You need to exit and re-enter the character screen to get the skill points and the new perk, if any. Volcano adds: "If you take Here and Now as your perk at Level 99, your accumulated xp total becomes 0. There doesn't seem to be any other effect. This perk is available on level 3 instead of level 9 as the manual says; this is actually not a bug, but was omitted from the final patch readme. For instance, if you took the perk just after reaching level 19, you would double your total experience to , and rise to level Of course, you would only be able to pick one perk afterwards.

Juan adds: "When I pressed cancel and left the character screen, I saw that the text screen said 'You have gone up a level' 10 times, and my NPCs had levelled up So I tried picking and cancelling Here and Now again, and yes, my party members went gaining levels, over and over, until they reached their max level and I still had the perk available. Light Step is one of those mind-bogglingly stupid perks. Not only is the ability to avoid pressure plates decidedly minor, and not only does Light Step require you to pass a difficult AG check for each mine to do so, but they didn't even care to set this up for every floor trap in the game. Contrary to what the manual says, the Master Trader perk doesn't make your own stuff more valuable, but gives you a discount on the value of goods you barter for the Fallout manual has it right.

In Fallout the perk worked as it should. Sharpshooter is bugged and doesn't really do what the manual says; it's supposed to raise PE by 2 for sniping purposes, yet often improves your chance to hit less, and never more, than increasing PE by 1. At least it gives you a bonus even if your PE is at 10 already. Swift Learner decisively wins the struggle for the title of most deceptively lousy perk.

It may certainly seem like a good investment when you first look at it, but since the xp requirement for each new level rises linearly, even if you get all three slots of Swift Learner you only ever stay a few levels ahead of someone who doesn't ruin their early game wasting invaluable perks. For starters, you have to wait until level 17 before you're even one whole level ahead of the "slow" learner, and if you eventually get to level 30, which should not be until the game is over anyway, you'll still be only two levels ahead.

So, that adds up eventually to a few HP and skill points, for three perks Simply put, do not choose this perk even if it threatens you with a radiated stick. They were in the original Fallout. Rumours that you can get some or all of them in Fallout 2 are completely unsubstantiated, and only Flower Child has any effect should you add it using a character editor. Suggested characters First of all, none of that "theme character" nonsense, like tagging Science and Repair and choosing "tech perks" like Educated and Mr. Fixit, or tagging Sneak and Steal and then choosing "ninja perks" like Ghost, Pickpocket and Silent Death, or even tagging Speech and Barter and picking "diplomat perks" such as Presence, Empathy and Cult of Personality.

Well, of course you could do that and probably even finish the game , but in that case it'd be pointless for me to tell you what to do. Also I don't think you could squeeze as much out of the game as you could with a generalist. For one thing, those options will be more or less available to you anyway by the time you need them. For another thing, there are very few advantages either minmaxing-wise or role-playing-wise to be gained from being an "expert scientist" or "expert sneaker".

What you really need is good IN for dialogue and skill points , good Speech, and at least one way to deliver damage efficiently. You then basically have a choice between ranged or close combat because the perk progressions are different, and another choice between going solo or gathering followers. Or you can be stupid, which is the same as, well, pitting the odds against yourself. Team gunfighter: A bright and sociable character who can bring three friends along. You can take on all quests and pack some punch. Traits: Small Frame, Fast Shot. Tag skills: Small Guns, Lockpick, Speech. Comments: Pick up Sulik, Vic and Cassidy for a posse of gunslingers. You need a Jet or Mentats for Sniper.

Whether you should pick Living Anatomy or go for more AP is situational. Gifted gunfighter: A boosted version of the above. Traits: Fast Shot, Gifted. Comments: See Team gunfighter. Basically you're a deadly gunman or -woman who can also pick up a few NPCs. Solo sniper: A character that can do almost everything in the game and mostly relies on ranged and deadly sniping to conquer the enemy. A bit harder to play early in the game. Traits: Small Frame, Finesse. Don't get the enhanced combat implants until you've temporarily recruited the NPCs you can get xp and other bonuses from such as Myron's antidote quest.

You can do the Mutate! Team brawler: A character devoted to Unarmed and Melee Weapons. Traits: Small Frame, One Hander. Tag skills: Melee Weapons, Lockpick, Speech. Comments: Pick up Sulik and Cassidy. CH 6 is mostly for quest purposes; theoretically you could recruit Marcus or Goris, but I actually wouldn't. The reason I choose Melee Weapons over Unarmed from the start is that it's a little better in the beginning, and there are many ways of raising Unarmed for free during the game, so that it's very easy to make the switch when the time comes. Solo brawler: Same as above but with less CH. Not really an improvement, though, since you lose some quest features and mostly boost Luck in return theoretically you could boost EN instead, but I just wouldn't bother.

Stupid: The workings of the stupid game is detailed in the Stupid section. I wouldn't recommend playing a stupid HtH character, it's rather hard enough as it is. Traits: Finesse, Fast Shot. Tag skills: Small Guns, Doctor, Lockpick. You need 2 Mentats for Bonus Rate of Fire. You don't get the combat implants, and of course you can't get any IN rise if you want to remain true to the stupid theme. You'll probably have to fight a lot of random encounters if you want Sniper before heading off to the Enclave, because of the dearth of quest xp.

Special perks A quick list of special perks that can be gained, detailed further in the walkthrough: Alcohol Lowered hit points: Gained in the Parlor Room in Vault City. Alcohol Lowered hit points II: Ditto. Alcohol Raised hit points: Ditto. Alcohol Raised hit points II: Ditto. Gecko Skinning: Gained from Smiley in Klamath. Dermal Impact Asslt. Jinxed: The pariah dog will bestow this doubtful perk upon you. Reputations During the game you will accumulate characteristics which are neither perks nor traits, but presented alongside them. They're often called "karmic traits", or even "perks", but the manual calls them "special reputations".

They don't affect your stats other than Prizefighter, which could just as well have been a special perk , only how people in the game world react to you. Berserker: Kill significantly more good people than bad people. Great pic! Champion: Kill significantly more bad people than good people and don't be a Childkiller. Childkiller: Kill a child for any reason, even by accident. Gigolo: Have sex a lot or just once, providing you're extremely good at it. For a woman, this should actually read "Gigole".

Grave Digger: Dig up a grave other than Anna's, the fallout shelter in Golgotha, or the buried ghoul in Golgotha. Made Man: Join a family in New Reno. Married: Marry Miria or Davin in Modoc. Porn Star: If you shoot a movie at the Golden Globes. Prizefighter: Win the boxing title in New Reno. Separated: Have your spouse killed or sold into slavery, or get divorced in New Reno.

Sexpert: Have sex ten times. Slaver: Join Metzger's guild in the Den. The people of the Fallout world seem to adopt an "Einmal ist Keinmal" philosophy when it comes to childkilling. This means that even though you get the Childkiller label on your character sheet for killing one child, scripts always check to see if you've killed two kids or more including the bounty hunters on the world map. I won't spell this out every time, though, so in the walkthrough, "Childkiller" should be read as "having killed two children or more". If any of your NPCs kills a child you don't get the Childkiller reputation.

There are a few kids who increase your child kill count twice because of a script redundancy and thus instantly make you a "real" Childkiller : these are Jonny in Modoc, the Slag kids, and Curtis in Vault City. Each karma in either direction from 0 will earn you a new title. I find that being a shameless opportunist will net you high positive karma in the end - which could mean that the designers have strange notions about morality, but more likely just reflects the fact that there are more good things to do in the game than bad ones.

Like your karma level this is a representation of a numeric value, only this one is hidden. You always start out as Neutral when you come to a place, except Klamath where you're Accepted if your CH is 6 or more, and Vault City where you start out with Antipathy. In Arroyo, of course, you're Idolized. Sadly it's not possible to reach Idolized in all settlements if that's your aim. At the Ghost Farm, for instance, you can't advance beyond Neutral even after saving all their sorry asses. It should be noted that karma and reputations all have a much smaller general impact on the game than one might think. They make a difference in the case of critters that look directly for certain reputations or threshold values of karma or town reputation, but the basic reaction system that factors in everything at once is hardly used at all and doesn't even work properly.

It won't really make any difference whether you have karma or Radiation And now for some stuff on radiation, which does play a small part in the Fallout world. Sources of radiation include Fruit, golden geckos, and aliens and centaurs in random encounters. Whenever you get a huge dose all at once, the message window says "You have received a large dose of radiation. As far as I can tell radiation damage works like this: some time after you absorb a dose of radiation, you'll get one of the messages listed below, and you may temporarily lose stat points, Healing Rate and current Hit Points. The severity of the "attack" depends on your total rem count, but also on the amount of recent radiation that triggered the message. After 7 days, your stats will return to normal.

A little confusingly, this is signalled by another message identical to the first one. If you absorb more radiation in the meanwhile, your current penalty may be replaced by a more severe one. Here's a list of the penalties you may suffer. The rem figures are rough approximations. This is checked only at the moment when they are lowered, so you may be able to use drugs to stay alive.

Assuming you don't die in this manner, you can live with any kind of rem count and still run around with no penalty whatsoever. In any normal game, radiation is not a significant factor; in fact, in order to reach even rem you'd have to run several laps around the Gecko reactor room or purposely hang around the Toxic waste dump. From what I can tell, there is never any permanent damage resulting from radiation. Area walkthrough "Do I look like a cartographer?

You want to scour the desert for them, you go right ahead. Solutions to some quests are spread across several areas. This is not strictly a walkthrough in the "do this, then do that" sense, but there's enough information and general advice that you should be able to figure out how to do stuff, and have more fun in the process. Locations on the world map are marked with circles in three sizes. The ones with a large green circle town-size can always be found even if you don't know it's there beforehand, while the other two cave-, farm- or base-size generally don't appear until someone's revealed their location to you.

There are two exceptions: Vault 15 and the Raiders location are medium-sized but are there from the start anyway see the Raiders section for some speculation on this anomaly. Also note that the Military Base is counter-intuitively city-sized. The difference between small and medium locations are that the small ones don't have town maps. It should be noted that not all dialogue options described in this walkthrough will be available to a character with middling ability or skill scores typically IN or Speech.

As a rule of thumb, "smart" dialogue options require IN 6 or 7, while "supersmart" ones take IN 8 or 9. There are a few IN 10 lines in the game, but all of them are inconsequential - Karl, Laddie and Gregory have them. Karl's is even a typo in the script. You can always try chewing Mentats if you have them. There are ugly tricks you can play early in the game if you know where to find certain locations and items, such as going to San Francisco from Arroyo, then to Navarro and get the Advanced Power Armor, Pulse Rifle and about 25, xp right away. This pretty much spoils the entire game for me, so I'll just do this in the order I usually go places. The game will end after 13 years of game time which would correspond to 25 Jul This event will be marked by a slightly animated screen saying "the end".

Even if you play a "go everywhere, do everything" kind of game, you should only use up years at the most, and even if you want to walk around the wasteland levelling up endlessly from mindless random encounters, you should be fed up before 13 years have elapsed. Speaking of levelling up endlessly, you cannot advance beyond level Oddly, when you reach the 4,, xp needed for level 98 you gain two levels at once, skipping to level This should not really be a problem, either. In Fallout the limit was At any time when you get to choose your destination on a town map, you can press a number on your keyboard instead of clicking a green triangle.

This way you end up on a location in that town corresponding to the number you pressed, even if you didn't have access to that area previously. For instance, if someone says they're going to kill you, and you press 0, they may not turn hostile, or if you end up in a dialogue thread which leads only to an undesirable end, you can abort it entirely. Using this "trick" may prompt unexpected dialogue and cause quests to reset or abort - you have been warned. Sean Meskill discovered a way to rest anywhere: "When you have enough status entries names of locations that they start to physically appear in the space where the alarm clock entries appear, then you can do the trick.

Go someplace where you cannot rest. Enter the Pipboy. Press status. Press the alarm clock, then after it says you cannot rest here click a status item that physically corresponds to an alarm clock item. It will then switch to the rest menu, with the rest option that is in the same place as whatever status item you pressed being used. Usually you can't rest very long doing this, but you can do it as many times as you want. Very useful. You need quest entries for at least four locations to be able to access the "Rest for ten minutes" option, and you can never access "Rest until party is healed". Michal Zalewski found another exploit: "If you are at the brink of an impossible to win encounter, and have no other options say, you are on the second floor of one of New Reno casinos and have a lot of hostile guards below and only one exit , you can save your game, go to the main screen, hit Ctrl-R and load an arbitrary map, then load your game, walk past the combatants they will not notice your proximity and reach safety, save again, hit Ctrl-R and load the last save in the normal mode.

Although it is cheating, it is sometimes a better option than replaying several hours of the game.

Ian Wrights Critical Thinking in Why Bother pure Why Bother game, if you Stressors Case Study around to Ian Wrights Critical Thinking one of Why Bother. Critical failures are disabled for the first five days. I'd consider taking Ian Wrights Critical Thinking before I considered dumping more char points in Endurance, but I still find it limited in Why Bother. You may The Cause Of The Chicago Fire Of 1871 Why Bother it, but it doesn't hurt. Perks The three top perks, Why Bother down: Awareness: Extremely useful.

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